Education jobs in Tampa climb

April 8th, 2018

The newest labor statistics posit that education jobs in Tampa are climbing.

Florida’s seasonally adjusted unemployment rate was 3.9 percent in February 2018, unchanged from the January 2018 rate, but down 0.6 percentage point from a year ago.  There were 398,000 jobless Floridians out of a labor force of 10,176,000.  The U.S. unemployment rate was 4.1 percent in February.

Florida’s seasonally adjusted total nonagricultural employment was 8,699,400 in February 2018, an increase of 26,700 jobs (+0.3 percent) over the month.

The state gained 167,800 jobs over the year, an increase of 2.0 percent.  Nationally, the number of jobs rose 1.6 percent over the year.  Prior to September 2017, Florida’s over‐ the‐year job growth rate had exceeded or equaled the nation’s rate since May 2012.

Other industries gaining jobs over the year included construction (+31,700 jobs, +6.3 percent); leisure and hospitality (+25,600 jobs, +2.1 percent); education and health services (+18,500 jobs, +1.5 percent); financial activities (+15,300 jobs, +2.7 percent); trade, transportation, and utilities (+14,900 jobs, +0.9 percent); manufacturing (+7,800 jobs, +2.2 percent); government (+6,200 jobs, +0.6 percent); and other services (+2,500 jobs, +0.7 percent).

Citrus and Sumter counties had the highest unemployment rate (5.5 percent each) in Florida in February 2018, followed by Hendry County (5.2 percent); and Highlands and Putnam counties (5.1 percent each).

In February 2018, 20 out of 24 metro areas in Florida had over‐the‐year job gains.  The areas with the largest gains were Orlando‐Kissimmee‐Sanford (+43,800 jobs, +3.5 percent), Tampa‐St. Petersburg‐Clearwater (+30,600 jobs, +2.3 percent), and Jacksonville (+18,600 jobs, +2.7 percent).

Company creates construction jobs in Tampa

April 4th, 2018

A number of new construction jobs in Tampa have been created.

Florida’s seasonally adjusted unemployment rate was 3.9 percent in February 2018, unchanged from the January 2018 rate, but down 0.6 percentage point from a year ago.  There were 398,000 jobless Floridians out of a labor force of 10,176,000.  The U.S. unemployment rate was 4.1 percent in February.

The number of jobs in Florida was 8,699,400 in February 2018, up 167,800 jobs compared to a year ago.  The industry gaining the most jobs was professional and business services (+46,900 jobs, +3.6 percent).

Other industries gaining jobs over the year included construction (+31,700 jobs, +6.3 percent); leisure and hospitality (+25,600 jobs, +2.1 percent); education and health services (+18,500 jobs, +1.5 percent); financial activities (+15,300 jobs, +2.7 percent); trade, transportation, and utilities (+14,900 jobs, +0.9 percent); manufacturing (+7,800 jobs, +2.2 percent); government (+6,200 jobs, +0.6 percent); and other services (+2,500 jobs, +0.7 percent).

February 2018, St. Johns County had the state’s lowest unemployment rate (3.0 percent); followed by Okaloosa County (3.2 percent); and Monroe, Orange, Seminole, Union, and Wakulla counties(3.3 percent each).

Citrus and Sumter counties had the highest unemployment rate (5.5 percent each) in Florida in February 2018, followed by Hendry County (5.2 percent); and Highlands and Putnam counties (5.1 percent each).

Have Tampa jobs grown?

April 4th, 2018

Tampa jobs may be growing steadily, according to recent labor statistics.

The last recession in the U.S. – more than 10 years ago – lasted only two years, but its impact on the U.S. workforce is still being felt. While the country as a whole boasts 6,692,837 more jobs in 2017 than in 2007, some states still haven’t fully recovered, and many of the occupations that are growing require workers to get additional training and/or education to fill them.

The following are seven states that had fewer jobs in 2017 than they did in 2007:

  • Alabama: 62,637 fewer jobs – 3 percent – in 2017 than in 2007
  • West Virginia: 33,428 fewer jobs – 4 percent – in 2017 than in 2007
  • Mississippi: 26,666 fewer jobs – 2 percent – in 2017 than in 2007
  • New Mexico: 23,422 fewer jobs – 2 percent – in 2017 than in 2007
  • Connecticut: 19,781 fewer jobs – 1 percent – in 2017 than in 2007
  • Wyoming: 13,257 fewer jobs – 4 percent – in 2017 than in 2007
  • Illinois: 11,682 fewer jobs – 0.2 percent – in 2017 than in 2007

States That Have Grown the Most Since 2007
Of the 40 states that had more jobs in 2017 than they did in 2007, 14 have outpaced the overall national job growth rate. The seven states with the largest net increase in jobs since 2007 are:

  • Texas: 1,699,505 more jobs – 15 percent – in 2017 than in 2007
  • California: 1,239,911 more jobs – 7 percent – in 2017 than in 2007
  • New York: 597,961 more jobs – 6 percent – in 2017 than in 2007
  • Florida: 455,134 more jobs – 5 percent – in 2017 than in 2007
  • Washington: 300,885 more jobs – 9 percent – in 2017 than in 2007
  • Colorado: 293,160 more jobs – 11 percent – in 2017 than in 2007
  • Massachusetts: 288,446 more jobs – 8 percent – in 2017 than in 2007

Occupations That Have Grown the Most Since 2007 Nationally
The recession had wide ranging effects, and no corner of the workforce was completely unaffected. Still, while the country overall has 4 percent more jobs than it did in 2007, some occupations have fared considerably better.

Tampa jobs some of the best in the nation?

March 7th, 2018

New labor market research points out that the Florida market is hot, and that Tampa jobs may be some of the best in the nation.

Indeed debuted the 25 best cities for job seekers in the United States, and found strong showings from the Sun Belt states of Florida, California, and Texas. Three of the top ten metro areas are in Florida, with Miami topping the list (#1), followed by Orlando (#2), and Jacksonville (#7).

A stronger labor market affords many opportunities for job seekers right now and is allowing for more lifestyle considerations to influence their job search. As such, Indeed created the “25 Best Cities for Job Seekers” list by analyzing U.S metro areas with the most job postings according to four categories: job market favorability, salary weighted for cost of living, and employee rankings for work/life balance and job security and advancement opportunities.

“The Sun Belt continues to be a region of high-growth and opportunity as companies and workers alike have moved toward strong job markets,” said Paul D’Arcy, senior vice president at Indeed. “We have seen a migration trend where people are moving away from cold places looking to live in warm climates, so it is no surprise that we are seeing companies providing more job opportunities in Sun Belt cities like Miami, Austin, and San Diego.”

Miami and South Florida serves as U.S. headquarters for Latin American operations for hundreds multinational corporations including Disney, American Airlines, Cisco, Exxon, Microsoft, Kraft Foods, Oracle, Sony, Visa International, and more, adding to a robust job market. According to Indeed data, the Miami metro area work/life balance and job security/advancement ratings by employees are ranked highest. The high marks for employee satisfaction coupled with job market favorability and salary/cost of living brought Miami to the top of Indeed’s “Best Cities for Job Seekers” list.

Texas and California metro areas made a strong showing on the list, with Austin (#4), Sacramento (#5), San Jose (#6), San Diego (#8), and Houston (#9) appearing in the top ten. Indeed findings also indicate that Raleigh (#3) ranked highest for job market favorability and Seattle (#17) ranked highest for salary/cost of living.

Many new STEM jobs in Tampa are being created

March 7th, 2018

STEM jobs in Tampa are flourishing, according to a recent report from the state’s labor bureau.

The Tampa area added 28,400 new private-sector jobs in the last year, continuing to create the second-highest number of jobs among all Florida metro areas.

The Tampa area also continues to rank first in the state in demand for high-skill, high-wage STEM occupations with 14,839 openings in November.

Tampa’s unemployment rate dropped to 3.6 percent, down 1.0 percentage point from one year ago.

Statewide, Florida businesses created 13,900 new jobs in November and the unemployment rate remained at 3.6 percent, the lowest rate in more than a decade. Since December 2010, Florida businesses have created 1,465,800 new private-sector jobs.

Governor Scott said, “It is great news that the Tampa Bay area, like the rest of the state, continues to have strong economic growth with more than 28,000 new jobs created over the year. It is clear that Tampa Bay continues to be a great place for businesses to grow and create jobs.”

The Tampa area remained first among the state metro areas in job demand in November with 44,792 openings.

In the last year, 199,000 people entered Florida’s labor force, a growth of 2.0 percent. This rate is nearly three times the national labor force growth rate of only 0.7 percent. In November, 16,990 Floridians were placed in jobs by CareerSource Tampa Bay and the state’s other 23 local workforce boards

Tampa is second in state job creation

February 5th, 2018

Tampa is one of the biggest job creation leaders in Florida, according to recent labor statistics.

The Tampa area added 28,400 new private-sector jobs in the last year, continuing to create the second-highest number of jobs among all Florida metro areas.

The Tampa area also continues to rank first in the state in demand for high-skill, high-wage STEM occupations with 14,839 openings in November. Tampa’s unemployment rate dropped to 3.6 percent, down 1.0 percentage point from one year ago.

Statewide, Florida businesses created 13,900 new jobs in November and the unemployment rate remained at 3.6 percent, the lowest rate in more than a decade. Since December 2010, Florida businesses have created 1,465,800 new private-sector jobs.

Governor Scott said, “It is great news that the Tampa Bay area, like the rest of the state, continues to have strong economic growth with more than 28,000 new jobs created over the year. It is clear that Tampa Bay continues to be a great place for businesses to grow and create jobs.”

The Tampa area remained first among the state metro areas in job demand in November with 44,792 openings.

In the last year, 199,000 people entered Florida’s labor force, a growth of 2.0 percent. This rate is nearly three times the national labor force growth rate of only 0.7 percent. In November, 16,990 Floridians were placed in jobs by CareerSource Tampa Bay and the state’s other 23 local workforce boards.

Wages for Tampa jobs climb

February 5th, 2018

Wages for Tampa jobs have increased, according to labor statistics.

The average annual wage in Hillsborough County rose by $9,552 from 2007 – 2016, the highest dollar amount increase among Florida’s major counties, according to data released by the Tampa Hillsborough Economic Development Corporation.

Hillsborough County’s current average annual wage of $50,768 is the second highest average annual wage in Florida, behind Palm Beach County at $51,098.

“Tampa and Hillsborough County’s sustained efforts to attract and grow companies that pay higher wages and invest in our community are paying off,” said Craig J. Richard, CEcD, FM, president and CEO of the Tampa Hillsborough Economic Development Corporation (EDC). “Employers are drawn to this region for the quality of talent they find here, and salaries are rising accordingly.”

From 2007–2016, Hillsborough County experienced the second highest percentage wage gain increase, 23.2 percent, among Florida’s most populous counties.

Pinellas County’s average annual wages grew by 24.6 percent for the same period.

Tampa Hillsborough Economic Development Corporation (EDC) is the designated economic development agency for Hillsborough County and the cities of Tampa, Plant City and Temple Terrace.  Established in 2009 as a partnership between the public sector and private corporate investors, the EDC works to develop and sustain a thriving local economy

Manufacturing jobs in Tampa rise

February 4th, 2018

New labor statistics show that manufacturing jobs in Tampa are climbing.

Employment increased by 200,000 in January, and the unemployment rate was unchanged at 4.1 percent, the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics reported.

In January, the unemployment rate was 4.1 percent for the fourth consecutive month. The number of unemployed persons, at 6.7 million, changed little over the month.

Construction added 36,000 jobs in January, with most of the increase occurring among specialty trade contractors (+26,000). Employment in residential building construction continued to trend up over the month (+5,000). Over the year, construction employment has increased by 226,000.

Employment in food services and drinking places continued to trend up in January (+31,000). The industry has added 255,000 jobs over the past 12 months.

Employment in health care continued to trend up in January (+21,000), with a gain of 13,000 in hospitals. In 2017, health care added an average of 24,000 jobs per month.

In January, employment in manufacturing remained on an upward trend (+15,000). Durable goods industries added 18,000 jobs. Manufacturing has added 186,000 jobs over the past 12 months.

Employment in other major industries, including mining, wholesale trade, retail trade, transportation and warehousing, information, financial activities, professional and business services, and government, changed little over the month.

Are workers calling in sick to Tampa jobs?

January 6th, 2018

Some workers may be calling sick to Tampa jobs, according to a recent Careerbuilder survey.

According to new CareerBuilder data, 40 percent of workers have called in sick in the last 12 months when they weren’t, compared to 35 percent in 2016 and 38 percent in 2015.

Female workers were more likely than their male counterparts to take sick days when they were well – 43 percent to 35 percent respectively.

While they may not necessarily be sick, 30 percent of workers who have called in sick cite having a doctor’s appointment as the top reason to take a sick day, followed by just didn’t feel like going to work (23 percent), needing to relax (20 percent), and needing to catch up on sleep (15 percent). Running errands (14 percent), catching up on housework (8 percent), and plans with family and friends (8 percent) also appeared on the list.

Nearly three in five workers who have a paid time off program (28 percent) say they feel obligated to make up an excuse for taking a day off, even though the majority of employees (54 percent) work for companies with a paid time off (PTO) program which rolls sick, vacation and personal days together.

When asked to share the most dubious excuses workers have given for calling in sick, employers reported hearing the following:

  • A bear was in employee’s yard and they were afraid to come out.
  • Employee’s phone exploded and it hurt their hand.
  • Employee ate a toothpick in his food at restaurant.
  • Employee broke his arm wrestling a female bodybuilder.
  • Employee called in “fat” because uniform didn’t fit.
  • Dog swallowed employee’s car keys so she was waiting until it came out.
  • Employee left his clothes at the laundry mat.
  • Employee did not have enough gas to get to work.
  • Employee had to re-schedule a new manicure because some of their artificial nails fell off.
  • Employee were not sure how the solar eclipse would affect them so it would be safer to stay at home.

 

Small business health plans and Tampa jobs

January 6th, 2018

Tampa jobs may be affected by a new small business healthcare plan.

The U.S. Department of Labor announced a Notice of Proposed Rulemaking to expand the opportunity to offer employment-based health insurance to small businesses through Small Business Health Plans, also known as Association Health Plans.

Up to 11 million Americans working for small businesses/sole proprietors and their families lack employer-sponsored insurance. These 11 million Americans could find coverage under this proposal. Many small employers struggle to offer insurance because it is currently too expensive and cumbersome. These employees – and their families – would have an additional alternative through Small Business Health Plans (Association Health Plans). These plans would close the gap of uninsured without eliminating options available in the healthcare marketplace.

Under the proposal, small businesses and sole proprietors would have more freedom to band together to provide affordable, quality health insurance for employees.

The proposed rule, which applies only to employer-sponsored health insurance, would allow employers to join together as a single group to purchase insurance in the large group market.

These improvements stand to open health insurance coverage for millions of Americans and their families by making it more affordable for thousands of small businesses and sole proprietors.

By joining together, employers may reduce administrative costs through economies of scale, strengthen their bargaining position to obtain more favorable deals, enhance their ability to self-insure, and offer a wider array of insurance options.

The proposed rule includes important protections for Americans. Small Business Health Plans (Association Health Plans) cannot charge individuals higher premiums based on health factors or refuse to admit employees to a plan because of health factors. The Department of Labor’s Employee Benefits Security Administration will closely monitor these plans to protect consumers.